ChristianEntrepreneur-poster

Hey guys, I wanted to chat with you real quick about entrepreneurship. If you haven’t figured it out yet, I have been really pressed to discuss about the marketplace and how God’s folk should be in it – not just be in it but THRIVE in it!

Let’s  be real direct today and discuss a couple of biblical characters who were entrepreneurs.

Abraham

We know from Genesis 13 that Abram was very wealthy in livestock, gold, and silver. By the time he had to rescue Lot in Genesis 14, he had over 300 trained men, presumably trained in the use of arms.

Beyond his wealth, Abram was an entrepreneur. The evidence for this is in Genesis 13, when Abram and Lot separate and Lot chooses to go to the fertile plain. This was an area favorably compared to the Garden of Eden. Presumably Abram got a less attractive, less fertile area, yet he continued to prosper. Lot’s material and spiritual condition both deteriorated due to his choice. He started out as wealthy as his uncle Abram, but ended up living in cave.

After getting the lesser land, Abraham’s wealth grew, as did his faith and walk with the Lord. By Genesis 21 Abraham was making treaties with kings and generals. Abraham had a faith and God-given vision of the future, and the perseverance to leave his home, obey, and see the task through.

Solomon

Solomon was unique among Jewish kings, as he seems to be the only one to have seen and profited from the geographical advantage of his kingdom.

Ancient Israel was located on two great ancient trading routes, the King’s Highway and Way of the Sea (the Via Maris), in addition to several lesser routes. Solomon engaged in trade, and he appears to be the only Jewish king to fully exploit the advantages afforded by these routes.

The Bible tells us Solomon was extremely wealthy, but he had to create his fortune, as much of it did not exist before. Solomon generated wealth by bringing peace to the kingdom, which allowed him to use his resources for production, rather than protection. In addition, he encouraged trade and was the only Jewish king with a trading fleet.

Conversely, Solomon’s son, Rehoboam, had a chance to solidify Israel’s position in the world. Instead, he chose poor advisers and made poor decisions. The kingdom essentially split over tax policy and forced labor . A wiser, more entrepreneurial man would have reduced these burdens and advanced the kingdom through other means, such as trade.

As you can see, the divine idea of entrepreneurship has been around since the beginning of time. What are you waiting on? Start your business, write your book, pitch your idea today!

Read more on Biblical Entrepreneurs Here.

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